Sunday, July 22, 2012

Citizen Journalists Needed

Another Angle On The Batman Shooting

"Mike Adams and Alex Jones are covering the Batman shooting with very good reports. No need for me to recycle their insights and evidence.

I want to make a few points.

Once law enforcement has satisfied itself that James Holmes acted alone, the case will be pushed along to a disposition: a confession or a trial or a plea. And with minimal fuss, the media will fall into line.

However, independent journalists like Alex and Mike will continue to look at the situation from many sides, because there are unanswered questions, contradictions, and political consequences. Front and center is the question: was the Denver attack in some way staged?

They will get flack for their continuing investigation. As usual, they will be called conspiracy theoriver, realize there is no government agency whose ordinary function is to stand back and look asts. Mainstream media professionals will express impatience and outrage.

Howet standard law-enforcement work.

The general public has been conditioned to expect nothing more than an arrest, a trial or a confession, and a verdict. When more is brought to the table by Web journalists or private citizens who aren’t satisfied with the law-enforcement work in the case, it is automatically looked upon as weird, unnecessary, and disruptive.

Particularly when the crime is horrific enough to jump the fence and attract 24/7 coverage for days on end, there is a schedule of events that runs by the book: interviews with the victims’ families, witnesses, and acquaintances of the accused; vigils; funerals; memorials; calls for healing; statements from politicians recommending new gun-control legislation; journalistic “heavyweights” assessing “what it all really means.”

This schedule runs. Outsiders who want people to stop, back up, and listen to unresolved questions about the crime and the case are viewed as rank intruders on the ceremonial march of the Ritual.

Cops and district attorneys don’t do Odd. They don’t consider nagging doubts. They don’t work issues that stand beyond their basic evidence and their confirmed perpetrator. No one in government does. (Although government agents are known to rig, obscure, twist, pervert, and invent cases to suit their designs.)

Who then should examine cases from a wider and more free-ranging perspective? Essentially, the rest of us. You can, for instance, find several brilliant private investigations of the Oklahoma City Bombing: a citizen-group effort led by Representative Charles Key; a 17-year deep probe by Patrick Briley that calls into question covert US foreign policy in the Middle East; a documentary overview by the producers of A Noble Lie; the book, Oklahoma City: Day One, by Michele Marie Moore, an extraordinary accomplishment—beyond what most journalists would dare to attempt.

In my experience, when informal “citizen grand juries” are voluntarily assembled to investigate a crime, they shed crucial light on areas where law-enforcement agents refuse to tread."

Rappoport is right on the money here, although it's a well trodden path.
These incidents aren't news, they're mind controlling events, and they follow a long understood pattern of manipulative propaganda to get you to believe what your overlords desire.

2 Comments:

Anonymous greencrow said...

Hi Nolo:

Here's a "citizen journalist" who has come up with a few interesting angles to the Batman False Flag massacre

http://willyloman.wordpress.com/

Interesting (and hopeful) to see how many mistakes the PTB make when they put on these sideshows.

gc

23/7/12 11:39 AM  
Blogger nolocontendere said...

Good blog, thanx gc.

25/7/12 3:55 AM  

Post a Comment

<< Home

Cost of the War in Iraq
(JavaScript Error)
To see more details, click here.